The Origins of Halloween

Halloween’s origins date back to the ancient Celtic festival of Samhain (pronounced sow-in). The Celts, who lived 2,000 years ago in the areas that are now Ireland, the United Kingdom, the Isle of Man, France, Northern Spain & Portugal, Western Germany, Switzerland, The Po Valley (Italy), Hungary and the Czech Republic celebrated their New Year on November 1st. This day marked the end of summer and the harvest and the beginning of the dark, cold winter, a time of year that was often associated with human death.

Celts believed that on the night before the new year, the boundary between the worlds of the living and the dead became blurred. On the night of October 31, they celebrated Samhain, when it was believed that the ghosts of the dead returned to earth. In addition to causing trouble and damaging crops, Celts thought that the presence of the otherworldly spirits made it easier for the Druids, or Celtic priests, to make predictions about the future. For a people entirely dependent on the volatile natural world, these prophecies were an important source of comfort and direction during the long, dark winter.

To commemorate the event, Druids built huge sacred bonfires, where the people gathered to burn crops and animals as sacrifices to the Celtic deities. During the celebration, the Celts wore costumes, typically consisting of animal heads and skins, and attempted to tell each other’s fortunes. When the celebration was over, they re-lit their hearth fires, which they had extinguished earlier that evening, from the sacred bonfire to help protect them during the coming winter.

About The Celtic Highlander

So, you might be wondering now how did Celtic Radio come to be? What is our inspiration? Celtic Radio was created to bring together a community of listeners, performers and musicians to share and converse in Celtic culture. Our inspiration for this endeavour is the music, but let’s face it, the radio waves and TV are ruled by an endless barrage of top 40 musicians and performers. Listen to your local AM or FM band and chances are you will not find many Celtic music stations, if you find any at all! How then can the devoted musicians that play at the Irish Festivals and Highland Games ever get heard beyond that venue? How can people discover Celtic music if there is no place to listen? Hence was born the idea of a free 24 hour Celtic Radio station available on the World Wide Web for all to enjoy.
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